Whistleblower to talk in Klamath

April 11, 2012 | By | Add a Comment

Whistleblower to talk in Klamath

Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2012 12:00 am

A scientist who filed a whistleblower complaint after being fired from his job advising the Bureau of Reclamation on ethical issues, including impact studies on removing four Klamath River dams, will talk next month during public appearances in Klamath Falls and Yreka.

Paul Houser, an associate professor at George Mason University, will speak at meetings arranged by the Cal-Ore Bi-State Alliance. The alliance is paying for Houser’s appearances.

The Klamath Falls meeting is 5 p.m., Sunday, May 6 at Triad School, 2450 Summers Lane.

The Yreka meeting is 6:30 p.m., Monday, May 7 at the Siskiyou Golden Fairgrounds. Siskiyou County Supervisor Jim Cook also invited Houser to speak at the supervisors’ May 8 meeting.

In a whistleblower complaint filed Feb. 24, Houser said Interior Secretary Ken Salazar indicated his support for removing the dams, a key requirement to implement the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement.

Because of Salazar’s support, Houser believes “the Department of the Interior has likely followed a course of action to construct such an outcome.”

Kate Kelley, deputy communications director with Interior’s Washington, D.C., office, said Houser’s complaints remain under review.

She said an independent peer review panel that evaluated the accuracy and objectivity of the Klamath Overview Report’s scientific findings determined it generally “connects to the sound science that underlies its conclusions.”

Draft report released

The draft Klamath Overview Report was issued in January as part of multi-step scientific investigation aimed at providing Salazar with information on whether studies should continue on removing the four dams. More than 150 federal, state and other scientists, engineers and technical experts were involved in conducting studies and preparing the report.

Organizers of Houser’s visits said they question the credibility of science in the dam studies and believe Houser was fired because he questioned the integrity of the dam removal study process. Houser was hired in April 2011 by the Bureau of Reclamation to review and insure the scientific data and credibility in the Klamath River dam removal project.

The Bi-State Alliance, a group started by the Siskiyou County Water Users and Siskiyou County Republican Central Committee, recently merged with Klamath Basin groups that oppose the KBRA and the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement, including the Klamath Off-Project Water Users, Klamath Bucket Brigade and individual irrigators, according to Off-Project president Tom Mallams.

“He validates what we’ve said all along,” Mallams said of Houser’s allegations of fraudulent science.

© 2012 Herald and News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2012 12:00 am

A scientist who filed a whistleblower complaint after being fired from his job advising the Bureau of Reclamation on ethical issues, including impact studies on removing four Klamath River dams, will talk next month during public appearances in Klamath Falls and Yreka.

Paul Houser, an associate professor at George Mason University, will speak at meetings arranged by the Cal-Ore Bi-State Alliance. The alliance is paying for Houser’s appearances.

Subscription Required

An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?

Login Now

Need an online subscription?

Subscribe

You must login to view the full content on this page.

Thank you for reading 6 free articles on our site. You can come back at the end of your 30-day period for another 6 free articles, or you can purchase a subscription at this time and continue to enjoy valuable local news and information. If you need help, please contact our office at 541-885-4410.

Have an online subscription?

Login Now

Need an online subscription?

Subscribe

The Klamath Falls meeting is 5 p.m., Sunday, May 6 at Triad School, 2450 Summers Lane.

The Yreka meeting is 6:30 p.m., Monday, May 7 at the Siskiyou Golden Fairgrounds. Siskiyou County Supervisor Jim Cook also invited Houser to speak at the supervisors’ May 8 meeting.

In a whistleblower complaint filed Feb. 24, Houser said Interior Secretary Ken Salazar indicated his support for removing the dams, a key requirement to implement the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement.

Because of Salazar’s support, Houser believes “the Department of the Interior has likely followed a course of action to construct such an outcome.”

Kate Kelley, deputy communications director with Interior’s Washington, D.C., office, said Houser’s complaints remain under review.

She said an independent peer review panel that evaluated the accuracy and objectivity of the Klamath Overview Report’s scientific findings determined it generally “connects to the sound science that underlies its conclusions.”

Draft report released

The draft Klamath Overview Report was issued in January as part of multi-step scientific investigation aimed at providing Salazar with information on whether studies should continue on removing the four dams. More than 150 federal, state and other scientists, engineers and technical experts were involved in conducting studies and preparing the report.

Organizers of Houser’s visits said they question the credibility of science in the dam studies and believe Houser was fired because he questioned the integrity of the dam removal study process. Houser was hired in April 2011 by the Bureau of Reclamation to review and insure the scientific data and credibility in the Klamath River dam removal project.

The Bi-State Alliance, a group started by the Siskiyou County Water Users and Siskiyou County Republican Central Committee, recently merged with Klamath Basin groups that oppose the KBRA and the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement, including the Klamath Off-Project Water Users, Klamath Bucket Brigade and individual irrigators, according to Off-Project president Tom Mallams.

“He validates what we’ve said all along,” Mallams said of Houser’s allegations of fraudulent science.

Filed in: Klamath

Dr. Paul R. Houser

About the Author (Author Profile)

Dr. Houser in an internationally recognized expert in local to global land surface-atmospheric remote sensing, in-situ observation and numerical simulation, development and application of hydrologic data assimilation methods, scientific integrity and policy, and global water and energy cycling. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Hydrology and Water Resources from the University of Arizona in 1992 and 1996 respectively. Dr. Houser's previous experience includes internships at the U.S. Geological Survey and at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Houser joined the NASA-GSFC Hydrological Sciences Branch and the Data Assimilation Office (DAO/GMAO) in 1997, served as manager of NASA’s Land Surface Hydrology Program, and served as branch head of the Hydrological Science Branch. In 2005, he joined the George Mason University Climate Dynamics Program and the Geography and Geoinformation Sciences Department as Professor of Global Hydrology, and formed CREW (the Center for Research for Environment and Water). Dr. Houser has also teamed with groundwater development and exploration companies (EarthWater Global and Geovesi) and has served as Science Advisor to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Dr. Houser has led numerous scientific contributions, including the development of Land Data Assimilation Systems (LDAS), the Hydrospheric States Mission (Hydros/SMAP), the Land Information System (LIS), the NASA Energy and Water cycle Study (NEWS), and the Water Cycle Solutions Network (WaterNet).

Leave a Reply

Trackback URL | RSS Feed for This Entry

Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Google PlusVisit Us On Linkedin